RDA plans future growth

RDA Barossa board members enjoying the facilities at the Two Wells Golf Club, from left to right (back) chairperson Ian O’Loan, CEO Anne Moroney, Wayne Perry, Charles Mansueto, Rhia Vines, Lynette Seccafien, executive Sue Merry, (front) Brian Carr, Jo Thomas, Tony Clark, Rolf Binder, and guest Steve Harrison.
RDA Barossa board members enjoying the facilities at the Two Wells Golf Club, from left to right (back) chairperson Ian O’Loan, CEO Anne Moroney, Wayne Perry, Charles Mansueto, Rhia Vines, Lynette Seccafien, executive Sue Merry, (front) Brian Carr, Jo Thomas, Tony Clark, Rolf Binder, and guest Steve Harrison.

Members of Regional Development Australia (Barossa) board met recently at Lewiston to discuss future planning and the role horticulture growth in the region might play.

Board members gathered at Two Wells Golf Club at Lewiston on Tuesday, April 8, with RDA Barossa chief executive officer, Anne Moroney, online casino saying the board was made up of industry members from the regional community and included representatives of the four councils across the region.

“In a nutshell, the role of RDA Barossa is to activate capital; human, natural resources and financial capital, to generate income and jobs,” Ms Moroney said. “In a way, through doing this RDA supports industry to ‘make its own luck’.”

A high priority of RDA Barossa is establishing water distribution infrastructure for the Greater Gawler Stormwater catchment area and bringing recycled water north of the Gawler River to drive further investment and jobs in vegetable growing, particularly in efficiently run glasshouses, she said.

RDA Barossa chairperson, Ian O’Loan, who lives in Mallala, said vegetable growing was a standout opportunity for the region.

“Well-designed and staged housing and employment growth in Two Wells and Roseworthy were other economic opportunities,” Mr O’Loan said. “Some excellent and detailed design work for Roseworthy, and Two Wells, has been undertaken.

“Roseworthy is particularly well situated with a university already in the town and only eight kilometres of rail connection to be activated to link it with metropolitan Adelaide, a vital connection if communities are to withstand future oil and energy shocks.

Mr O’Loan said Roseworthy had strategic employment lands with advanced manufacturing and agricultural service and supply businesses already in place.

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